How to Write a Conclusion Paragraph for an Essay

How to Write a Conclusion Paragraph for an Essay

  • An effective conclusion paragraph is vital to writing a successful college essay.
  • A strong conclusion restates the thesis, offers new insight, and forms a personal connection.
  • Be sure the conclusion doesn’t introduce new arguments or analyze points you didn’t discuss.

The first steps for writing any college essay are coming up with a strong thesis statement and composing a rough introduction. Once you’ve done that, you can collect information that supports your thesis, outline your essay’s main points, and start writing your body paragraphs. Before you can submit the essay, though, you’ll also need to write a compelling conclusion paragraph.

Conclusions aren’t especially difficult to write and can even be fun, but you still need to put in effort to make them work. Ultimately, a strong conclusion is just as important as an effective introduction for a successful paper.

Here, we explain the purpose of a conclusion and how to write a conclusion paragraph using a simple three-step process.

How to Write a Conclusion in 3 Easy Steps

Step 1: Restate Your Thesis Claim and Evidence

The conclusion’s primary role is to convince the reader that your argument is valid. Whereas the introduction paragraph says, “Here’s what I’ll prove and how,” the conclusion paragraph says, “Here’s what I proved and how.” In that sense, these two paragraphs should closely mirror each other, with the conclusion restating the thesis introduced at the beginning of the essay.

In order to restate your thesis effectively, you’ll need to do the following:

Here’s an example of an introduction and a conclusion paragraph, with the conclusion restating the paper’s primary claim and evidence:

Step 2: Provide New and Interesting Insight

In addition to restating the thesis, a conclusion should emphasize the importance of the essay’s argument by building upon it. In other words, you want to push your ideas one step beyond your thesis. One intriguing insight at the end can leave your professor pondering your paper well after they finish reading it — and that’s a good sign you turned in a well-written essay.

Note that the conclusion paragraph must only mention that this new idea exists and deserves some focus in the future; it shouldn’t discuss the idea in detail or try to propose a new argument.

The new insight you raise in your conclusion should ideally come from the research you already conducted. Should a new idea come to you while writing the body paragraphs, go ahead and make a note to remind you to allude to it in your conclusion.

Here are some typical starting points for these new insights:

Step 3: Form a Personal Connection With the Reader

The final step when writing a conclusion paragraph is to include a small detail about yourself. This information will help you build a more intimate bond with your reader and help them remember you better. Think of this step as an opportunity to connect the academic research to your and your reader’s personal lives — to forge a human bond between the lines.

Formal essay-writing typically avoids first- and second-person pronouns such as “I” and “you.” There are, however, two exceptions to this rule, and these are the introduction and conclusion paragraphs.

In the introduction, you may use the words “I” or “me” just once to clarify that the essay’s claim is your own. In the conclusion, you may use first-person pronouns to attempt to establish an emotional connection with the reader, as long as this connection is related in some way to the overarching claim.

Here’s an example of a conclusion paragraph that uses both first- and second-person pronouns to connect the thesis statement (provided above) to the student’s own perspective on stealing:


Feature Image: Ziga Plahutar / E+ / Getty Images

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